High tide

Written by on June 5, 2009 at 12:45 pm

When my father decided to move us from Chelsea to the little rural community of Pepperell, I was angry. I was a teenager, used to living in a city surrounded by my mother's family. I had best friends, public transportation and a wicked attitude. I had no idea what my father was moving us to. He said it was the "country."  My concept of country was limited to what I saw on Bonanza and Gunsmoke. I expected everyone in town to own a horse, a barn and a rifle.

My grandmother recognized my anger for what it was: fear. She told me I had nothing to be afraid of, because "water seeks its own level."

I had no idea what she was talking about.

I was moving to the country, whatever that meant. I was leaving the T behind, St. Stan's and John's Corner Market. What did water levels have to do with anything?

Now I get it. She wasn't giving me a science lesson. She was talking about finding people with common values. People do find each other; we make friends with people who share the same interests or have similar goals. The Challenge Walk is more than a fundraising event; it's an opportunity to be with people who are passionate about making a difference.

My grandmother used to use another old adage: "high tide raises all boats."  The Challenge is a high tide; it raises our awareness of MS, the Chapter Office and the fight against MS. Most importantly, it raises our hope.

I am so glad to be part of that tide.

Diagnosed with MS in 1994, Patty responded the way many do: she refused to discuss it. It took her ten years to realize that silence isn't the answer. She, her friends and family formed the Blister Buddies for their first Challenge Walk in 2004. Patty is now on the Challenge Walk Steering Committee and chairs the PR Subcommittee. In November 2008, she became a member of the Greater NE Chapter's Board of Trustees.

Comments are closed.