bicycling

...now browsing by tag

 
 

Team Susie's MSpin-a-thon

Written by on May 20, 2012 at 8:00 am

Ready to burn? Come join in the fun, food, and festivities at the MSpin-a-thon! Enjoy some spinning (indoor, stationary cycling) on Sunday, May 20th, 8 AM – 11 AM, at the Spinnaker Point Recreation Center in Portsmouth, NH.

  • You can choose to ride 1, 2 or the maximum of 3 hours.
  • The donation fee is $20 per/seat, per/hour.
  • All proceeds benefit Team Susie and the National MS Society.
  • Solicit support from friends and family — ask them to pay your entry fee!

Please RSVP on Facebook!

This is the events calendar, featuring official NMSS rallies and meetings as well as volunteer-sponsored fundraisers. Want to see your event listed here? Please submit the details, and we'll add it!

Winter exercises to keep the body moving

Written by on November 8, 2010 at 10:19 am

If you live in New England, this morning's mushy mess followed by this evening's early sunset will confirm what you've long been fearing: winter is here.

Fortunately, us northerners are made of hardy stock that will survive the long, cold, dark season, an experience that will make the spring shedding of scarves for shorts all the sweeter. Then our bones will creak and muscles stretch as we start to get back in shape for the MS Challenge Walk. Any doctor will tell you that health is something easier to retain than regain. So how can we keep in shape all year long and not just when it's warm out?

There are plenty of aerobic exercises you can enjoy year-round, regardless of the weather. The most obvious answer is to join a gym or the Y, where you can walk and run on treadmills, use step machines, or join dance and yoga classes. But being cooped up indoors is not always the answer for winter doldrums, especially at the rates some gyms charge.

Cross Country Skiing along Great Glen TrailsIf you prefer to be outdoors taking advantage of the unique opportunities offered by the cold, try cross-country skiing. The Cross Country Ski Areas Association lists eight trails in Massachusetts alone, with more throughout the region.

Or, if you're like our stalwart leader of the bike crew, you can ride your bicycle, even in the snow. Icebike.org has more details on taking this risk.

Personally, I enjoy contra dancing. It's a smoke-free, alcohol-free, family-friendly activity that accommodates all skill levels, especially beginners. Live music and fun people combine in a routine that's the equivalent of walking several miles. (Seriously — they've measured the distance traveled by dancing feet!)

How do you keep your body moving in the winter? Share your suggestions in the comments below!

Ken joined the MS Challenge Walk in 2005, more than a decade after his mother was diagnosed. After walking for three years and 150 miles, he switched to the support crew and now rides his bicycle along the trail, providing whatever encouragement (and snacks!) he can to the 600 walkers. He is also an alumnus of the event's steering committee and is this site's webmaster.

Biking and walking for a cure

Written by on September 23, 2009 at 1:15 pm

Note: This post is courtesy guest author Jim Moran.

This was my third year doing the MS Challenge Walk, and my third year on the bike crew. Riding support is always a fun time, as I get the chance to ride with some really great bike riders; it felt like we'd been riding together for ages!

The best part of being on the bike crew though is getting to see and meet the wonderful people that walk in the event.  We get a great opportunity as bike crew to frequently check in on the walkers and get to know many of them rather well.

The stalwart Jim Moran, victorious over both heel and wheel. Photo courtesy Sara Wells.

The stalwart Jim Moran, victorious over both heel and wheel. Photo courtesy Sara Wells.

That said, this was the first year that I actually got on my feet and walked the final ten miles with the rest of the D-Terminators team and get the chance to experience the walk from their perspective.  To their surprise — and mine! — there were no blisters or other anticipated aches and pains.  But I did get the chance to feel the support and the kindness that's always being given by the crew we encounter on the route.

The only down side of walking was I only got to interact with the few walkers that were in the same area that I was in, instead of seeing everyone's smiling faces as I rode up and down the trail. Everyone on the walk is so great, I can't help but want to see them all!

Being on the support crew is a great way to support the walk and be a part of it.  Consider registering as crew for the 2010 event. That's the way I plan to continue doing the walk for as long as I'm "young enough" to do it.  Hopefully the cure we all pray for will be found before I'm "old enough" to have to stop.

Ken joined the MS Challenge Walk in 2005, more than a decade after his mother was diagnosed. After walking for three years and 150 miles, he switched to the support crew and now rides his bicycle along the trail, providing whatever encouragement (and snacks!) he can to the 600 walkers. He is also an alumnus of the event's steering committee and is this site's webmaster.

Wachusett Reservoir bike ride

Written by on June 6, 2009 at 8:30 am

Old Stone Church
West Boylston, MA

Cross-training is an important part of getting ready for the MS Challenge Walk, so instead of walking, today we'll be bicycling. We'll meet just north of Worcester at the intersections of Rts. 12 and 140 for a loop that will take us into Clinton and Boylston and around the Wachusett Reservoir. The shortest such route is 17 miles, or you can continue into the center Holden to add another 11 miles. You can see the proposed route at Google Maps. The pace will fairly slow, roughly 14 MPH.

If you'd like to come, please RSVP using this blog's contact form.

This is the events calendar, featuring official NMSS rallies and meetings as well as volunteer-sponsored fundraisers. Want to see your event listed here? Please submit the details, and we'll add it!

Riding the Challenge Walk

Written by on May 18, 2009 at 2:20 pm
Looking to mix up your Challenge Walk experience?  Consider hopping on a bike!
Looking to mix up your Challenge Walk experience? Consider hopping on a bike!

I received a good question today from my friend Melody, who has walked the Challenge Walk these past few years. She's decided to join the bicycle support crew in 2009 and wonders, "I am a little concerned about the training…how much do you usually ride before the walk?" I made a similar transition from walker to crew last year and discovered that being on wheels doesn't take the "challenge" out of "challenge walk"! I am not an expert bicyclist, but I'm happy to share my experience.

I rode only 2-3 times a week leading up to the event. I got accustomed to going 10-20 miles at a time, though one Sunday I did drive down to the Cape Cod Rail Trail and ride its length and back, which proved to be about 55 miles. It can be very useful if you have a little onboard computer that calculates your mileage.

The farthest I've ever ridden in a single day is a metric century — that is, 100 km, or 62 miles. Unfortunately, that was the first day I'd been on my bike in two weeks. Was I SORE!! Consistency is the most important quality of training.

Depending on how you handle being on bike crew, you may go as few as 25-30 miles a day, or as many as 50+. Since it's not hard pedaling, you may find the greatest challenge comes just from being in that seat for so long… so make sure it's a comfortable one!

Whether you're a first-time rider like Melody or have done it before like me, every crew member should sign up for the NMSS's crew training session, where you can get all your questions answered… even the ones you haven't thought of yet.

Ken joined the MS Challenge Walk in 2005, more than a decade after his mother was diagnosed. After walking for three years and 150 miles, he switched to the support crew and now rides his bicycle along the trail, providing whatever encouragement (and snacks!) he can to the 600 walkers. He is also an alumnus of the event's steering committee and is this site's webmaster.