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Stop for a story

Written by on September 2, 2009 at 1:49 pm

It's never too late to get good publicity! Since many newspapers assume their readers have short attention spans, now is the best time for pre-event coverage of next week's MS Challenge Walk.

As we suggested doing in a previous blog post, Rhonda Lake told her story, and the North Attleboro Free Press listened. The resulting article, "MS fight becomes a family affair", highlights the team effort that fighting MS and walking the walk can be.

Rhonda doesn't just tell her story; she listens, too. As the paper points out: "To keep herself going, Rhonda said she talks to other walkers, some with MS, others who walk for loved ones. 'I always stop and ask the story,' she said."

There will be hundreds of stories on Cape Cod next week, and hundreds of new friends. As you walk and talk, be sure to stop and listen, too.

Ken joined the MS Challenge Walk in 2005, more than a decade after his mother was diagnosed. After walking for three years and 150 miles, he switched to the support crew and now rides his bicycle along the trail, providing whatever encouragement (and snacks!) he can to the 600 walkers. He is also an alumnus of the event's steering committee and is this site's webmaster.

News coverage in the Fitchburg Pride

Written by on June 17, 2009 at 4:54 pm

When I encouraged you to tell your story, I promised updates with success stories. Here's our first!

Barbara Carter of the Mamas and Papas got some great coverage in her hometown's newspaper, The Fitchburg Pride. The story is titled "Strides for a cure: Local team fundraises for MS Walk" and covers the social, physical, and financial aspects of the MS Challenge Walk. It's a great piece that brings attention to the cause, the event, and Barbara's team. That's the best kind of publicity — and it's free!

To get your own story out to the media, fill out the NMSS's online form, and their public relations firm will take care of the rest.

Ken joined the MS Challenge Walk in 2005, more than a decade after his mother was diagnosed. After walking for three years and 150 miles, he switched to the support crew and now rides his bicycle along the trail, providing whatever encouragement (and snacks!) he can to the 600 walkers. He is also an alumnus of the event's steering committee and is this site's webmaster.

Tell your story!

Written by on May 27, 2009 at 12:21 pm

In just a few months, Cape Cod will see 600 people walk for multiple sclerosis. What they won't see is what each walker carries with them: their reason for walking. Everyone who accepts the challenge of walking 50 miles has a story. Some people walk for their loved ones; some walk for themselves; others walk simply because someone has to. Every walker's story is one of hope, dedication, and courage — and the NMSS wants to help you tell your story.

The surest way we can defeat multiple sclerosis is by making it a personal cause; when others see the impact it has on them and their loved ones, they can't help but want to contribute to a world free from MS. That's why the NMSS is asking you to tell your story by filling out its online form. The NMSS's communications department and their public relations firm will collaborate to get your story in front of potential donors, spreading the word about our movement.

The power of effective marketing cannot be understated. I filled out the form a few years ago and got a call from my hometown's newspaper. They sent a reporter and photographer to my mom's house to interview us; here's the resulting story (opens as a PDF). It ran on the paper's front page just a week before the MS Challenge Walk and resulted in a few pledges and phone calls — several hundred dollars over the years that I otherwise would not have raised.

Not feeling particularly eloquent? Don't worry — that's the publicist's job! Just give us the details, and our public relations machine will get to work. We've already had other successes in getting your stories told, and we'll repost them here throughout the summer.

I encourage you to take the time to tell your story. It's a great way to show how proud you are of the people in your life!

Ken joined the MS Challenge Walk in 2005, more than a decade after his mother was diagnosed. After walking for three years and 150 miles, he switched to the support crew and now rides his bicycle along the trail, providing whatever encouragement (and snacks!) he can to the 600 walkers. He is also an alumnus of the event's steering committee and is this site's webmaster.